Main IndexAuto Repair Home Search Posts SEARCH
POSTS
Who's Online WHO'S
ONLINE
Log in LOG
IN









Search Auto Parts

Socket Design Question


  Email This Post



Versa09
User

Sep 23, 2017, 3:36 PM

Post #1 of 8 (210 views)
Socket Design Question Sign In

I found myself in need of a socket set this morning and living out here in the sticks, I drove to Walmart and bought a Stanley socket set like the one pictured below.

Stanley calls these sockets a "Universal 6-in-1" design where, instead of the usual hexagonal socket shape, the sockets have an odd arrangement of 12 (I think) shallow ridges.

I didn't think much about it in the store, but after getting home and immediately rounding off a stubborn bolt on my vehicle with one of these sockets, I started thinking about this design.

Am I right in thinking that these sockets are only applying force to the bolt corners and will be more prone to rounding nuts and bolts than traditional hexagonal sockets which would seem to distribute force across the whole bolt head than just the corners? Should I just stick to standard sockets?

Is there a better budget brand/socket set I should consider instead? I'm looking for a lot of bang for the buck(~$50) in terms of versatility, i.e. reasonable precision and durability in 3/8 ratchet with SAE/Metric deep and shallow sockets/ 1/4 ratchet with SAE/Metric sockets.

Link deleted .................... not allowed


-
2009 Nissan Versa Hatchback 1.8 L, 6-speed manual transmission.
1999 Pontiac Grand Am SE, 2.4 L

(This post was edited by Hammer Time on Sep 23, 2017, 5:04 PM)


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Hammer Time profile image

Sep 23, 2017, 5:09 PM

Post #2 of 8 (201 views)
Re: Socket Design Question Sign In

Those are a gimmick design called spline drive. Yes it will fit multiple style bolts heads but it doesn't work good on any of them.

If you only want to spend $50 on a socket set, all you are going to get is junk. A quality set of sockets will cost you nearly $50 for each socket. To get the best bang for your buck, Craftsman would be the way to go.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



(This post was edited by Hammer Time on Sep 23, 2017, 5:10 PM)


Versa09
User

Sep 23, 2017, 8:45 PM

Post #3 of 8 (179 views)
Re: Socket Design Question Sign In


In Reply To
Those are a gimmick design called spline drive. Yes it will fit multiple style bolts heads but it doesn't work good on any of them.

If you only want to spend $50 on a socket set, all you are going to get is junk. A quality set of sockets will cost you nearly $50 for each socket. To get the best bang for your buck, Craftsman would be the way to go.


Thanks, HammerTime. Craftsman sounds like a good call. After hearing what professional tools go for I'm a little embarrassed to admit that I was having trouble justifying the cost of Craftsman for a set of tools I only expected to use a dozen or so times a year, but boogering up the head of that bolt today was something of a wake-up call and could have easily wound up costing more than a Craftsman socket set, if not in real dollars then certainly in terms of the time and aggravation required to get that bolt out of my cylinder head.
-
2009 Nissan Versa Hatchback 1.8 L, 6-speed manual transmission.
1999 Pontiac Grand Am SE, 2.4 L


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Sep 24, 2017, 4:29 AM

Post #4 of 8 (157 views)
Re: Socket Design Question Sign In

Arggh? What type of "boobered" up head of a bolt to you need to remove - rusted or messed up like the wrong size was use or what? There are both special tools and trick not universal to each problem.


Why it happened if mechanic error is the problem. Yes - sometimes you sacrifice a socket or tool once and a list of ways. Can't think of those universal sets being a great idea except for a small tool box to carry with you for emergencies perhaps,
T



Versa09
User

Sep 25, 2017, 6:55 AM

Post #5 of 8 (133 views)
Re: Socket Design Question Sign In


In Reply To
Arggh? What type of "boobered" up head of a bolt to you need to remove - rusted or messed up like the wrong size was use or what? There are both special tools and trick not universal to each problem.

Why it happened if mechanic error is the problem. Yes - sometimes you sacrifice a socket or tool once and a list of ways. Can't think of those universal sets being a great idea except for a small tool box to carry with you for emergencies perhaps,
T


We eventually got the bolt out, but the problem was that we'd rounded off the head trying to remove it with a spline drive socket. That was the gist of my original question, i.e. since those spline drive sockets only apply force to the corners of the bolt head, are they more prone to damaging bolts than traditional hex sockets.

That's a moot question at this point, though, since I've decided to return the set and go with traditional sockets.
-
2009 Nissan Versa Hatchback 1.8 L, 6-speed manual transmission.
1999 Pontiac Grand Am SE, 2.4 L


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Sep 25, 2017, 7:46 AM

Post #6 of 8 (129 views)
Re: Socket Design Question Sign In

Glad you got it.
Just speaking for myself - so many times either already found "rounded off" heads of nuts or bolts my own trick of a few depending on where or what is to mix up which socket already correct but now the bolt isn't should be an "impact socket" but have wasted others is find one that is just so slightly smaller between already a wild assortment of tools.
1st - look for the metric or SAE, SIX point best that if still a credible fastener messed up hammer that on OVER the problem hex most of the time it will just work and be so stuck then you have the purchase (grip) you really need for its removal expecting that you will replace the fastener and know you are risking ruining that socket works for me quite frequently unfortunately many times the problem was it was rusted but same if rounded by error for another reason that can include poor quality first try by another.


Just add to you chances when possible not always possible or the right choice is HEAT - glowing hot in the right spot(s) have to also know that isn't causing a disaster works famously.


Of the last few one was an anti-theft lug nut - nothing was going to work and the unique socket intended lost this case an exterior spare tire unused or removed for many years also expecting it stuck or sticky anyway worked first try.


Things to use or do so it never happens again still depends on what and where is use of PB if you have time let that set for a whole day does help. Prevention is grease threads and even heads of fasteners you know you be there again later proactively like the silver like grease of Pematex, brush in cap "Anti-seize" works wonders for especially exhaust fasteners.
By glowing heat must know when that's possible it has to be targeted at the right spot and super fast to be glowing plus also ready in seconds with the known correct socket or tool.


Not much wrecks a job when you shear off a blind threaded bolt if the case for extracting those. To get that hot at speed requires use of Oxy/Acet. Many will try common propane torch which is too slow makes it worse actually.


Trivia: Hardened fasteners if intact and ever made to glow have then lost their hardness rating so always should be replaced with proper new. Take note of that - throw that out no matter how good it looks for reuse!
T



Versa09
User

Sep 25, 2017, 8:14 AM

Post #7 of 8 (123 views)
Re: Socket Design Question Sign In

Thanks Tom! We actually did get the bolt loose by hammering on a slightly smaller socket. I was dubious, but it worked, and we did replace the bolts with new ones.

PB Blaster sounds promising, too. I'll snag a can next time I'm at the parts store.
-
2009 Nissan Versa Hatchback 1.8 L, 6-speed manual transmission.
1999 Pontiac Grand Am SE, 2.4 L


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Sep 25, 2017, 8:32 AM

Post #8 of 8 (121 views)
Re: Socket Design Question Sign In

One more now on PB. Check what that comes with now in spray cans? I haven't bought more in some time but hated the nozzle it came with made a wild mess for one spot of need! Found that brand Gummout spray top that has and accepts a tube nozzle you can either target where it sprays or put it in a container it will not eat thru (strong stuff!) and use just a Q-Tip to put drops on just what you want.
Watch out. Paint - wires or whatever around that dang stuff will eat up stuff if you make a mess with it! Great product - lousy that it makes a mess up to serious destruction. Hope they've changed that,
Tom







  Email This Post
 
 


Feed Button




Search for (options) Privacy Sitemap

shopify
site analytics