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97 Mustang GT Camshaft Upgrade


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MrMustang93
User
MrMustang93 profile image

Sep 8, 2009, 11:42 PM

Post #1 of 10 (2070 views)
97 Mustang GT Camshaft Upgrade Sign In

Hello guys i've just bought a 97 Mustang GT with the 4.6 SOHC. The previous owner blew the motor up in it so i've bought another motor and while i got it out i would like to ad some performance to it. So i would like alittle input on whats the best camshaft i can get. i dont want anything crazy but something better than stock. the only mods i have are bbk shorty headers, H-Pipe (no cats), and 3.73 gears. I'm looking for performance and great sound also! some with a nice lope sep.


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Sep 9, 2009, 10:13 AM

Post #2 of 10 (2063 views)
Re: 97 Mustang GT Camshaft Upgrade Sign In

It's a '97. Everything you are thinking about will shorten engine life and is illegal in many states. Good grief - those cars go like gazelles without doing anything so why do you want more?

Want real muscle - go 1960s and forget this car IMO,

T



fliptail
User

Sep 9, 2009, 12:37 PM

Post #3 of 10 (2056 views)
Re: 97 Mustang GT Camshaft Upgrade Sign In

Arbitrarily replacing just the cam (without intake and fuel inj/carb mods) may actually cause it to run worse. I'd find some old mustang magazines where reviews and tips have been given and go with that.


MrMustang93
User
MrMustang93 profile image

Sep 11, 2009, 12:09 AM

Post #4 of 10 (2041 views)
Re: 97 Mustang GT Camshaft Upgrade Sign In

yeah i know its illegal in some states but im in Mississippi and they don't care about anything. I do mean anything. You can drive your car with busted windshield, car smoking, tail pipes hanging, back firing, missing body parts, etc... and they wont say nothing, but they are strict on seat belts lol


MrMustang93
User
MrMustang93 profile image

Sep 11, 2009, 12:11 AM

Post #5 of 10 (2040 views)
Re: 97 Mustang GT Camshaft Upgrade Sign In

we don't have inspections and teens can get there licences at the age 14.


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Hammer Time profile image

Sep 11, 2009, 3:46 AM

Post #6 of 10 (2029 views)
Re: 97 Mustang GT Camshaft Upgrade Sign In

Tampering with the emissions on a certified vehicle is against FEDERAL law. Mississippi was still part of the US last time I checked.



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We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



Guest
Anonymous Poster

Sep 11, 2009, 10:06 AM

Post #7 of 10 (2021 views)
Re: 97 Mustang GT Camshaft Upgrade Sign In

I'm not sure "tampering" is the correct word......


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Hammer Time profile image

Sep 11, 2009, 10:22 AM

Post #8 of 10 (2018 views)
Re: 97 Mustang GT Camshaft Upgrade Sign In

If you change anything in the engine management system from the way it came from the factory, the law calls that tampering.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



Guest
Anonymous Poster

Sep 11, 2009, 10:29 AM

Post #9 of 10 (2013 views)
Re: 97 Mustang GT Camshaft Upgrade Sign In

Thanks. I'd like to read about that law, where can I find it?


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Hammer Time profile image

Sep 11, 2009, 10:42 AM

Post #10 of 10 (2009 views)
Re: 97 Mustang GT Camshaft Upgrade Sign In

Here's one link that summarizes it but there pages and pages of laws and regulations concerning this.
The "line outs" weren't there when I copied them. I guess I wasn't supposed to copy them.



http://autos.yahoo.com/...ffler/ques081_0.html

Background
Most people have been aware for some time that removing or bypassing emissions controls on a vehicle is illegal. In fact, an individual performing such modifications to their own vehicle is also subject to penalty for making such modifications. Specifically, such actions are considered "tampering". However, it is unlikely that many people out there with a JC Whitney catalog and dreams of their own highly customized vehicle have any notion of the scope of the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA)'s definition of tampering.
Just how sweeping is USEPA's definition of tampering? Well, over the years, they have developed an extensive paper trail in response to individual questions. A representative of USEPA was sufficiently helpful to provide a number of memoranda and letters which USEPA has developed to advise the regulated community as to whether the modifications they have in mind are legal.
In a nutshell, there essentially are no legal exhaust modifications. Anything you do to alter backpressure or the time it takes for your catalytic converter to heat up can be considered tampering. USEPA pushes these definitions to the extent that you could plausibly be accused of tampering if you tuned your carburetor to something other than factory specs. Is there good news? Yes. USEPA doesn't intend to make this an enforcement priority. Essentially, that means that they maintain their legal right to fine you, but won't do so unless the political opportunity presents itself.
The following paragraphs detail USEPA's position as it relates to many commonly held ideas among automotive enthusiasts.The Statute
In the Clean Air Act and the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 Congress gave USEPA the authority to regulate mobile sources. In addition to requiring automakers to design automobiles that met increasingly stringent emissions limits, these laws also established provisions to prevent anyone from defeating those modifications. In a letter dated November 14, 1997, Steve Albrink of the Vehicle Programs & Compliance Division of the Office of Mobile Sources of USEPA wrote a letter providing a more accessible interpretation of USEPA's policy than that contained in the official USEPA interpretation, Memorandum 1A (Office of Enforcement and General Counsel, dated June 25, 1974, Mobile Source Enforcement Memorandum No. 1A, SUBJECT: Interim Tampering Enforcement Policy) and subsequent changes to that policy, including fining individuals as well as repair shops. Mr. Albrink's letter states:
The federal tampering prohibition is contained in section 203(a)(3) of the Clean Air Act (Act), 42 U.S.C. 7522(a)(3). Section 203(a)(3)(A) of the Act prohibits any person from removing or rendering inoperative any device or element of design installed on or in any motor vehicle in compliance with regulations under Title II of the Act (i.e., regulations requiring certification that vehicles meet federal emissions standards). The maximum civil penalty for a violation of this section by a manufacturer or dealer is $25,000; for any other person, $2,500. Accordingly, any change from the original certified configuration of a vehicle or engine, or the manufacture or sale of a non-original equipment aftermarket part or system could be considered a violation of section 203(a)(3) of the Act. This would include modifications to the fuel delivery system.
The Policy
So, according to USEPA, pretty much any modification to your vehicle that in any way alters anything from the intake air to the tailpipe exit constitutes tampering. In fact, USEPA has developed an extensive list of specific questions and answers detailing just how extreme this view is.
    Here is a sampling of this interpretation:
  • Can I remove a catalytic converter from a vehicle that is used only for "off-road" driving?

    No. The tampering prohibition discussed in Answer #1 applies to this situation as well. The federal tampering prohibition pertains to "motor vehicles," which are defined by section 216(2) of the Act as "any self-propelled vehicle designed for transporting persons or property on a street or highway." A light-duty vehicle manufacturer certifies an engine-chassis configuration as meeting the applicable emissions standards for motor vehicles manufactured in a given model year, and it is not legal for anyone to "de-certify" a motor vehicle for "off-road" use.
    [I wonder if NASCAR knows about this?]
  • Is it tampering to install a dual exhaust system on a vehicle originally equipped with a single exhaust?

    Yes. The general rule is that a motor vehicle emission control system (which includes the exhaust configuration) may not be changed from an EPA certified configuration without subjecting the repair shop to liability for violating the federal tampering prohibition. The exhaust system configuration, including the location of the converters, and exhaust pipe diameter and length, are items specified by the manufacturer because engines and some of the associated emissions systems are generally affected by the exhaust system backpressure, which subsequently affects vehicle emissions. The installation of a dual exhaust system with two converters would, therefore, be considered tampering. ? It would not be considered tampering to install a dual exhaust system with two converters if the vehicle manufacturer certified an identical engine-chassis configuration for the vehicle model year or newer that includes such an exhaust configuration.
  • If I pass a standard state inspection test (i.e., a "sniff" or Inspection/Maintenance Test) is my vehicle legal?

    No. The testing that the manufacturers perform to demonstrate compliance with Federal standards is more comprehensive and accurate than the idle tests used by the Inspection/Maintenance (I/M) programs. For example, the procedures for light-duty cars and trucks require the vehicles to undergo prescribed sequences of fueling, parking, and operating in order to simulate an average trip in an urban area. Heavy-duty engine testing requires a similar transient mode testing procedure. During these procedures, the emissions are sampled continuously over the entire test cycle for subsequent analyses of specific components by prescribed analytical techniques. These procedures are more representative of in-use operation than any state or locally run idle emissions test.

    Idle emissions tests used by state I/M programs are designed merely as screening tests for identifying gross emitting vehicles which have not had proper maintenance (spark plug replacements, air filter changes, timing adjustments, carburetion adjustments, etc.), and not to detect whether specific emission control components are present and operational. The tests usually only involve the insertion of a probe into the tail-pipe of the vehicle while the vehicle is idling and instantaneously measuring the exhaust emissions. These tests are not as stringent or accurate as the Federal test procedures and the results are not comparable. It would be inaccurate to assume that just because a vehicle "passes" an idle test that it could also pass Federal standards.

Here is a list of documents provided by Mr. Steve Albrink to further elucidate the USEPA position:

These documents paint a fairly bleak picture for the automotive aftermarket.




~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



(This post was edited by Hammer Time on Sep 11, 2009, 10:44 AM)






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