Main IndexAuto Repair Home Search Posts SEARCH
POSTS
Who's Online WHO'S
ONLINE
Log in LOG
IN









Search Auto Parts

Compressor isolation block


  Email This Post



stustev
Novice

Jun 20, 2018, 4:03 PM

Post #1 of 10 (233 views)
Compressor isolation block Sign In

I am looking for a block to connect to the hose fitting block so I can pull a vacuum on the A/C system and test everything except the compressor.Where might I find such a beast?thanks


Sidom
Veteran / Moderator
Sidom profile image

Jun 20, 2018, 4:10 PM

Post #2 of 10 (231 views)
Re: Compressor isolation block Sign In

I've never needed something like that, I'm not sure it even exists?

Why don't you just hook up the comp & vacuum the whole system?


stustev
Novice

Jun 20, 2018, 4:20 PM

Post #3 of 10 (227 views)
Re: Compressor isolation block Sign In

I did draw the whole system down. It lost all vacuum within a couple minutes. I 'assume' the compressor is leaking. I would like to isolate the compressor from the rest of the system and draw the rest of the system down to see if the compressor is the culprit.


Sidom
Veteran / Moderator
Sidom profile image

Jun 20, 2018, 4:31 PM

Post #4 of 10 (215 views)
Re: Compressor isolation block Sign In

That's a pretty big leak...The normal way to track down a leak that big would be to put refrigerant or nitrogen in the system, use a leak detector & find the leak....

Did you leak check your vacuum setup?...... If you are using a manifold set & vacuum pump, disconnect the hose fittings & shut them....put a vacuum on the gauge set and make sure it holds vacuum...

Since I don't know what you are working on or what you have done to it,,,,these are just a couple of generic suggestions...


stustev
Novice

Jun 20, 2018, 4:38 PM

Post #5 of 10 (210 views)
Re: Compressor isolation block Sign In

I shut off the gages and they didn't leak down. Yes, major leak. That is why I suspect the compressor. What I am working on is not important (I don't think). I think my question is generic enough. I would use the block on other vehicles. I have a commercial chiller. The ports have shut off valves that allow you to isolate the compressor for testing. I thought this would be nice in the automotive world.1997 Pontiac Trans Sport Montana is what I am working on. Had a heck of a time finding the high side port. Internet search is an amazing resource.thanks


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Hammer Time profile image

Jun 20, 2018, 5:12 PM

Post #6 of 10 (199 views)
Re: Compressor isolation block Sign In


Quote
I would use the block on other vehicles.


That would be pretty hard to do since there are hundreds of different style connections to the compressor. Even the GM styles has varying depths on the ports.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



Sidom
Veteran / Moderator
Sidom profile image

Jun 20, 2018, 5:15 PM

Post #7 of 10 (197 views)
Re: Compressor isolation block Sign In

I guess you are try to do this to confirm the comp as the problem....I suppose that would work...if the comp was the problem....but what would you do if it still leaks vacuum with the manifold blocked off?

Yea some service ports are buried..... You should try finding the low side on a mid 2000s Focus for the 1st time...... ;)


stustev
Novice

Jun 20, 2018, 5:54 PM

Post #8 of 10 (185 views)
Re: Compressor isolation block Sign In

I have some nitrogen and gages to pressurize the system. I have some R22 to use with the nitrogen and a sniffer if needed. If I found a leak in the rest of the system I would 'cuss' and then fix it. A major leak like this should have an oil stain to help find it. The compressor is oily but the water pump is leaking also so which one is causing the wetness on the front of the motor? I can hardly see the compressor from the top or on a lift from the bottom. Must disassemble passenger side layers to get to the compressor and drivers side layers to get the the dryer. Sometimes, Leonard Nimoy comes to mind when trying to find underhood components (In Search Of).


stustev
Novice

Jun 20, 2018, 6:01 PM

Post #9 of 10 (179 views)
Re: Compressor isolation block Sign In


In Reply To

Quote
That would be pretty hard to do since there are hundreds of different style connections to the compressor. Even the GM styles has varying depths on the ports.


I think a block with a hole deep enough to swallow the longest port protrusion and an oring seal to seal against the face of the block would allow drawing a vacuum. This may reduce the different sizes necessary to cover a lot of cars.
I may be wrong. I might build one for this vehicle and see how it works.


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Hammer Time profile image

Jun 20, 2018, 6:07 PM

Post #10 of 10 (173 views)
Re: Compressor isolation block Sign In

I don't know if you have ever purchased a new GM HR6 compressor but it comes with about 10 different adapter seals/spacers for all the different manifold applications that are possible. They do stagger the depths you realize.

If you are having a hard time looking for leaks on the compressor, wait until you try the evaporator.

PS, coolant stains look nothing like refrigerant oil stains.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



(This post was edited by Hammer Time on Jun 20, 2018, 6:08 PM)






  Email This Post
 
 


Feed Button




Search for (options) Privacy Sitemap