Main IndexAuto Repair Home Search Posts SEARCH
POSTS
Who's Online WHO'S
ONLINE
Log in LOG
IN









Search Auto Parts

97 Skylark cranking problem


  Email This Post



Guest
Anonymous Poster
sthomasc@bellsouth.net

Sep 7, 2006, 4:04 AM

Post #1 of 4 (1427 views)
97 Skylark cranking problem Sign In

I had the fuel pump replaced in my 97 Skylark this week. When I got it back, it no longer cranks automatically when I turn the ignition switch. I took it back to the mechanic and I am basically being told that they do not know why and I should live with it. I am not happy! Is there a relay or pick up in the system that they could have screwed up? I hate having to coax it into cranking by patting the excelerator and listening to it spin. Has anyone any ideas?


DanD
Veteran / Moderator
DanD profile image

Sep 7, 2006, 8:07 AM

Post #2 of 4 (1422 views)
Re: 97 Skylark cranking problem Sign In

Ok the first thing we need to establish is that we are on the same page when it comes to terminology.
Cranking the engine means just that, picture a very old car that you see in the movies; one that someone actually goes to the front of the car with a crank handle; inserted it through a hole and manually cranks (turns) the engine until it started. Hence the term cranking the engine.
Today when we turn the key of the ignition switch we are engaging the starter motor and it cranks the engine for us.
So is your car cranking for a long time and not starting (I think that’s what you’re trying to say) or is the engine not cranking when you turn the ignition switch to the start position.
Dan.

Canadian "EH"






Guest
Anonymous Poster
sthomasc@bellsouth.net

Sep 7, 2006, 12:28 PM

Post #3 of 4 (1417 views)
Re: 97 Skylark cranking problem Sign In

Thank you for the response and forgive my lack of "auto" terminology (LOL). When I turn the key in the ignition, the starter engages and tries to crank the car. I have to manually feed the fuel by patting the accelerator. After several attempts, the engine will finally catch and I can go on my way. Since I am use to it starting when I turn on the ignition, this is a real pain in the patoot. My understanding is that there is suppose to be an electronic pickup (for lack of a better description) that brings the fuel for quick ignition when the key is turned. I am used to this and enjoyed the quickness at which it occurred. I feel that my current situation is wasting gas and is something that can leave me stranded. Any idea is welcomed.


DanD
Veteran / Moderator
DanD profile image

Sep 7, 2006, 2:00 PM

Post #4 of 4 (1413 views)
Re: 97 Skylark cranking problem Sign In

If this hard starting only began after the replacement fuel pump went in, there maybe a problem with the check valve in the new fuel pump. This check valve is designed to hold a column of fuel between the pump and the fuel injectors. If this check valve is leaking fuel or the fuel line connection between the pump and sending unit is leaking internally (clamp left loose); fuel will siphon back to the fuel tank, emptying the fuel rail and lines. What that means is that the pump now has to refill the lines, fuel rail and then start to pressurize the fuel before the engine will start. Kind of like what happens after you’ve run out of gas; the first start up after you’ve put some gas in the tank the engine will crank for a lot longer then normally that’s until it can fill and pressurize the system.
As for this “electronic pick up” it isn’t a separate device; what happens is when you turn the ignition from the off position to the on position; as in not cranking the engine yet but all the warning lights are on. At this point the computer will energize the fuel pump but for only a couple of seconds (at the most). This is to start the process of pressurizing the fuel system and is called the prime cycle. As you continue to rotate the ignition switch to the start position and the engine begins to crank. The computer sees a crank signal and again turns the pump back on to run the engine.
Fairly easy to check this with the use of a fuel pressure gauge connected to the fuel system. Run the engine and record the pressure reading on the gauge; shut the engine off; this pressure should hold, not loosing any more then 3 to 6 psi after a time frame of 10 to 20 minutes. If the pressure drops off as soon as the engine has stopped the fuel system has some form of leak.
Check valve a line or whatever, it should hold pressure; after a number of hours the fuel pressure will dissipate to zero but there still should be a solid column of fuel in the lines sitting there waiting to be pressurized by the prime cycle.
Hope I didn’t lose you; sometimes when I type these things out they make sence to me but I leave everyone else in a fog.
If this is the case just YELL at me to try again. LOL
Dan.

Canadian "EH"






(This post was edited by DanD on Sep 7, 2006, 4:25 PM)






  Email This Post
 
 


Feed Button




Search for (options) Privacy Sitemap