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Question about navel jelly removal


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cubeus19
User

Jul 10, 2012, 2:14 AM

Post #1 of 8 (4104 views)
Question about navel jelly removal Sign In

Hi everyone, just recently I used some navel jelly to remove rust off of exhaust pipes.

But while using it some of it dripped onto my garage floor and some of it dried and it left a white stain on the garage floor.

I tried using a all purpose cleaner to clean the stain off but it doesn't even budge.

Anyone have any idea on how to remove this white stain caused by the navel jelly? Thanks!


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Jul 10, 2012, 3:20 AM

Post #2 of 8 (4073 views)
Re: Question about navel jelly removal Sign In

It has actually etched the concrete and I doubt you will do anything for it.



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Tom Greenleaf
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Jul 10, 2012, 3:27 AM

Post #3 of 8 (4070 views)
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A search for this stuff which I thought was extinct showed it is basically Phosphoric Acid and that it is not recommended for cement if your floor is cement.

Only clean up product mentioned was water. Your floor might have permanent damage.

Tried to copy what NOT to use product on might come out screwy below...........
Not Recommended For
  • Aluminum
  • Chrome
  • Fiberglass
  • Cement
  • Marble
  • Plastic

__________________________

Could be trouble and unsure of any easy fix. If only a color change in cement you may have to live with it or some insanely expensive redo or if that concerned about a garage floor's appearance specialty paints which I would avoid as most just peel off later and a nightmare to fix that.

Read label on product you used and perhaps ask them for suggestions as it might be a different acid or who knows?

T



cubeus19
User

Jul 10, 2012, 11:14 AM

Post #4 of 8 (4053 views)
Re: Question about navel jelly removal Sign In

Let's see when I got up earlier I went over to one of the worst stains that was on the garage floor and I just brushed it really hard with a wire brush and the stain went away. It was some kind of white powder residue so I'm going to do the same thing with the rest and see if I can get the rest of them out as well.


Discretesignals
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Jul 10, 2012, 5:23 PM

Post #5 of 8 (4037 views)
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Navel jelly? I don't know why, but I keep invisioning someone putting jelly in their belly button. Naval right? I guess they used that stuff in the Navy originally?





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nickwarner
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Jul 10, 2012, 6:19 PM

Post #6 of 8 (4029 views)
Re: Question about navel jelly removal Sign In

rust removal gel for ships. gets it ready for paint in the crevices you can't reach easy


Discretesignals
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Jul 10, 2012, 6:37 PM

Post #7 of 8 (4025 views)
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So, using naval jelly on the exhaust system. I guess the OP is prepping it for paint?





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nickwarner
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Jul 10, 2012, 7:55 PM

Post #8 of 8 (4015 views)
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If you don't have the facility for an acid dip tank or a sandblaster, it would be a suitable alternative to get all crevices prepped for paint. You can brush it on and rinse it off with great results. Realize that phosphoric acid is one of the two ingredients in muriatic acid which is not only a great rust remover but also used to etch concrete and the post makes sense. Had the job been done outdoors we wouldn't have heard about it.






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