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tire pressure question


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c_elliott
User

Apr 15, 2011, 7:43 AM

Post #1 of 9 (3376 views)
tire pressure question Sign In

My new car came with the stock wheels and a set on 20s. I plan on putting the 20s on my jeep grand cherokee over the weekend.2 of the wheels need tires which im getting tomorrow. But i was wondering about tire pressure.
The back of the wheel says 60 psi. Is that what goes on the tire or is it the normal of around 32 psi? The tire size on the wheels are 225/35/20.

Also since im putting the wheels on my jeep should i go with a bigger tire and buy all 4 or should i just replace the 2 bad ones. Ive never had big wheels on a car before and since i have them i might aswell use them since they will fit both vehicles.

If i keep the same tire size will i have much of a speedo problem from going from a 235/65/17 to the 225/35/20


Hammer Time
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Apr 15, 2011, 7:46 AM

Post #2 of 9 (3372 views)
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That's the fastest way i know to just destroy the suspension, ride, handling and steering linkage of the vehicle.



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We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



(This post was edited by Hammer Time on Apr 15, 2011, 7:47 AM)


re-tired
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Apr 15, 2011, 9:10 PM

Post #3 of 9 (3356 views)
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Everyones after the "look". And you will prob. do it regardless to our advise . My own son has 27's on his dodge 3500 dually(groan). This required the purchase of a $700 reprogrammer to make it drivable again. You will have the problems that HAMMER TIME has named ,plus,driveabilty troubles.Besides speedometer error and shift points,your gas mileage will go down the drain >>>>>>>>>Have you checked gas prices in the last hour ???<<<<<<<<<<<


LIFE'S SHORT GO FISH


Tom Greenleaf
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Apr 15, 2011, 9:13 PM

Post #4 of 9 (3356 views)
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Totally agree with HT on this. OE spec wheels/tires are well thought out and IMO shouldn't mess with that,

T



c_elliott
User

Apr 15, 2011, 9:51 PM

Post #5 of 9 (3351 views)
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Ok i understand what you guys are saying. The wheels and tires put side by side with the oem are smaller from ground to top. And 27s are just dumb. And my tire pressure question wasnt answered. I know what gas prices are this is not a everyday vehicle.


Tom Greenleaf
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Apr 15, 2011, 10:16 PM

Post #6 of 9 (3347 views)
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I can't know the tire pressure for non OE size tires. PSI suggestions are for OE tires. If smaller rubber may need more and more rubber touching road - less or handling would be screwed up. Hey - do what you want but expect disappointments or worse, handling so bad it could be a hazard,

T



re-tired
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Apr 16, 2011, 3:02 PM

Post #7 of 9 (3332 views)
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As for tire pressure . Run whatever is stamped on the sidewall . Monitor your tire wear and adjust slightly according to wear.,


LIFE'S SHORT GO FISH


Passingtrucker
Novice

Jun 22, 2011, 12:22 PM

Post #8 of 9 (3229 views)
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In Reply To
As for tire pressure . Run whatever is stamped on the sidewall . Monitor your tire wear and adjust slightly according to wear.,

Strongly agree with Re-tired. You're accustomed to running 35 psi, but you'll observe your Jeep Grand Cherokee's 225/35/20 probably has "LT" written on it. Light truck tires are designed for heavy payload and require more psi because they have thicker sidewalls than passenger tires, which run on 35 psi. Going below the manufacturer's 60psi written on the sidewall will increase rolling resistance, leading to more fuel consumption. The thicker sidewalls on LT tires are less likely to suffer a tire blowout, which is prevalent among passenger tires on thinner sidewalls. Besides lower mpg due to increased rolling resistance when you go below the manufacturer's psi requirement, the tire will suffer premature wear because rolling resistance will also cause the tire to run hotter.


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Jun 22, 2011, 2:16 PM

Post #9 of 9 (3222 views)
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Passingtrucker - Please look at the dates of the post! From April to now late June I hope the person has figured it out,

T







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