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carbon remover


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milling machine
User

Jul 3, 2010, 6:35 PM

Post #1 of 6 (3258 views)
carbon remover Sign In

I have a question are those carbon removers worth using, the kind you spray in or pour in. I just put in a rebuilt engine and the intake valves of the old head were all carboned-up, I had some leftover carbon remover (GM type stuff) that you spray in. So to see if the stuff would really work I sprayed all the intake valves,of the old head and let them soak for hours and I did this four or five times and to my surprise the stuff hardly worked at all


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Hammer Time profile image

Jul 3, 2010, 7:36 PM

Post #2 of 6 (3253 views)
Re: carbon remover Sign In

The heat of combustion will help break it up after the solvent softens it but it doesn't always work. You have to get the engine hot and pour enough in to stall the engine and let it sit for a while. Now start it up and give it a hard run. That usually works.



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Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Jul 4, 2010, 8:49 AM

Post #3 of 6 (3247 views)
Re: carbon remover Sign In

History 101 on carbon build up: Man do I feel old now. Way back it was routine to very slowly pour water into a hot engine and you could watch the junk fly out the tailpipe! DON'T DO THAT NOW!

I've seen ordinary ATF poured (gotta go slow) into intake do the trick and now a product called "Deep Creep" by the company that makes SeaFoam is like shaving cream and much less apt to cause 'hydraulic' lock which would cause untold damage.

I've seen the additive in the snake oil isles that are supposed to work by just putting it in the gas tank but not sure if they do or not really.

Most that demonstrate a problem just a good hard run, full blast acceleration would heat up enough to blow it out. You don't need to red-line engine or speed over limits but it should be in a safe low traffic roadway and so far recently that was enough for the very few now I notice symptoms.

Heat as Hammer mentioned seems to be the main factor. The vehicles that had the problem were all "poke around town" use only and never really warmed up fully for extended periods of time.

I worry what this could do to converters and o2 sensers now that those are higher tech than the first ones.

Now with almost all engines with aluminum or alloys used I would be extra careful and not rush to have things totally cleared out all at once - slowly allow stuff to work unless something is so bad you have to take things apart to correct this.

Was (still can be) a very real problem - much more common when lead was used in gasoline,

T



milling machine
User

Jul 4, 2010, 4:18 PM

Post #4 of 6 (3239 views)
Re: carbon remover Sign In

So water will actually work, why can't you use it now? And would the best way to apply be with a spray bottle if you spray it a little at a time


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Jul 4, 2010, 4:51 PM

Post #5 of 6 (3235 views)
Re: carbon remover Sign In

It would work but too risky with alloys and gasket materials now used. Seems like yesterday that a whole engine was cast iron and gaskets made of laminated asbestos products that could take a hand grenade and wouldn't phase them. Not so today or VERY risky.

Story on it: Had a part time kitchen job with a top notch chef for a short time. They used almost exclusively iron fry pans that were baked on hopelessly with burned in oils and whatever that about needed a machine shop to clean!

Don't do this either - but the chef got the pans about red hot and the kitchen's main sink was like a bath tub size thing and he would take those hopeless pans and items and quick dunk them in relatively cold water vs the red hot pans. Yikes - they came out clean as new with no scrubbing, solvents or anything but that sudden shock from hot to cold.

Just checked an old piston I've kept for show and it's cast iron! That's prehistoric now. Alloys could warp or crack easily. Arggh - the materials used for years and years now for engines is dedicated to save weight and warm up quickly for fuel efficiency, power, and faster to produce less emissions as they warm up faster.

These metals and even plastics used now have enough troubles without shocking them with water. Go the slower, safer way and be sure you really have a carbon problem. Many will show as high compression exceeding specs!

Perhaps a "Motor Vac" professional injection cleaning would double up and take carbon out too. Ask a shop that does that and has the machine - I don't so can't say whether that would do the trick and also clean up fuel injectors to peak performance,

T



milling machine
User

Jul 4, 2010, 5:26 PM

Post #6 of 6 (3227 views)
Re: carbon remover Sign In

Thanks for the answer






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