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How to learn auto-parts/function


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Nicky159
New User

Dec 5, 2012, 4:22 PM

Post #1 of 3 (1573 views)
How to learn auto-parts/function Sign In

Hello, im 17 and been doing basic things on trucks and cars for my entire life ive always liked working on them. but theres a problem, i cant remember the names of the more advanced and some of the basics to save my life. Im about to start rebuilding a 1965 ford f-100 and want to know what im talking about when i tell people about it. any ideas?


Discretesignals
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Discretesignals profile image

Dec 5, 2012, 5:30 PM

Post #2 of 3 (1532 views)
Re: How to learn auto-parts/function Sign In

You have a whole bunch to learn. Infact you'll learn and then learn some more....heck you can spend your entire life constantly learning about automobiles. It never ends.

Best advice is to google as much as you can on things you don't understand. Don't be afraid to take things apart to see how they work. Working on the F100 alone will give you an idea what is going on behind all that paint and sheet metal. Just don't take anything apart such as Dad or Mom's cars. If you can get hold of automotive basics books at your local library, that covers a lot of information. Don't be afraid to ask someone questions if you don't understand anything. If you want to make a career out of working on automobiles, talk to your guidance consuler at school.





Since we volunteer our time and knowledge, we ask for you to please follow up when a problem is resolved.

(This post was edited by Discretesignals on Dec 5, 2012, 5:32 PM)


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Dec 7, 2012, 7:15 AM

Post #3 of 3 (1476 views)
Re: How to learn auto-parts/function Sign In

Nick + 17 years old: Starting from scratch it seems. #1 learn how to not hurt yourself.

What's available to you for possible HS classes, night school or perhaps a job at a shop doing anything in or around ongoing repairs? If left to the web you lose hands on experience but can learn the concepts of how things work and names of components.

A decent public library could be quite helpful either via computer or paper text books used in vocational schools. If you are motivated you'll find a way. You do need to start with basics of names of parts, types of fasteners and tons more to even get going. Nobody is born with it so find the info or work in and around it.

Good luck,

T






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