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CO2 or nitrogen in radial tires


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chas
User

Aug 25, 2014, 11:08 PM

Post #1 of 6 (741 views)
CO2 or nitrogen in radial tires Sign In

been using CO2 instead of nitrogen in my radial tires.....have not had any problems.....tire problems like seperations has stopped, wear and life has been good with CO2......it does seem to have a lot of tire pressure sepage loss.

the nitrogen and the tank for my home use is considerably more expensive than than the CO2, tank and regulator.....alot use CO2 because it is much less expensive with no problems.

would like to hear from those using nitrogen.....is the sepage more or less than CO2?....should i change over to nitrogen?.....did i miss anything or any other suggestions? thanks.....


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Aug 25, 2014, 11:27 PM

Post #2 of 6 (734 views)
Re: CO2 or nitrogen in radial tires Sign In

I don't find alternative gasses for tires of much purpose for about 99% of applications for automotives uses. Temperature extremes I can understand and it about stops there. What's wrong with plain dry air?


T



chas
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Aug 25, 2014, 11:50 PM

Post #3 of 6 (728 views)
Re: CO2 or nitrogen in radial tires Sign In


In Reply To
I don't find alternative gasses for tires of much purpose for about 99% of applications for automotives uses. Temperature extremes I can understand and it about stops there. What's wrong with plain dry air?


T


well Tom, regular air has alot of moister in it. you need a dryer in the line to remove the moister in the air. i dont think stations with the cheap pumps you put your dollar in will have a water remover. also the heat exchange is not good with air.

alot of tire tire problems went away when i changed over to CO2. Mostly seperations, bulges in the tread, side wall and failures stopped. from what i understand is moisture from the regular air gets into the construction of the tire like the plies and belts. The water seperates the plies then i started having problems like vibration, bulges and seperations. that cannot be fixed. i had to get another new tire. im told nitrogen is best but the tank and gas is much more expensive at the gas exchange depot. CO2 has been working well. tire life is much better. would like to hear from those using nitrogen.


(This post was edited by chas on Aug 25, 2014, 11:52 PM)


Hammer Time
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Aug 26, 2014, 2:15 AM

Post #4 of 6 (717 views)
Re: CO2 or nitrogen in radial tires Sign In


Quote
when i changed over to CO2. Mostly seperations, bulges in the tread, side wall and failures stopped.


I don't believe that for a second. Most tire defects and failures are caused by impacts and heat, not what kind of air is used in them.



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Discretesignals
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Aug 26, 2014, 4:09 AM

Post #5 of 6 (707 views)
Re: CO2 or nitrogen in radial tires Sign In

Aren't you going to have air in moisture in the tire before you pump it full of CO2? Or do you put your tire under a vacuum to get the air and moisture out before you charge it with C02? Crazy





Since we volunteer our time and knowledge, we ask for you to please follow up when a problem is resolved.


Tom Greenleaf
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Aug 26, 2014, 5:08 AM

Post #6 of 6 (704 views)
Re: CO2 or nitrogen in radial tires Sign In

Quote">
well Tom, regular air has a lot of moister in it. you need a dryer in the line to remove the moister in the air. I don't think stations with the cheap pumps you put your dollar in will have a water remover.<"


Just compressing air squeezes a lot of moisture out hence tanks have drains if not to provide dry air to get the water out of the bottom.


DS's suggestion is on target and can see it now. Put tire on rim into a full vacuum of course watching it collapse and come off the rim.


Subject is a bit moot for automotives as said. It counts for steady pressure at various temps. Note that tires say the "cold" fill pressure suggested not after even a drive they'll warm up and pressure of ambient air rises 1 PSI for each 10F such that if you fill tires with zero leakage at 50F and check again at 100F you'll see the 5lbs change. Vehicles with tire pressure monitors and warnings on dash all begin to set warning this time of year with cold nights already where I am. Relax or fill for the upcoming colder weather as most do or should anyway.


Note when tires are in transit before sold some are left out in the weather and get rained on and are loaded with moisture even when wiped dry which is near impossible or would be too time consuming. Better tires come wrapped to prevent this.


Tread separation is as HT mentioned, heat (excessive hot roads, speed of travel and ambient temp all combined) weakens them but it's near always road trauma that finishes off the separation.


A common recall of entire lines of tires is the steel used exposed to moisture before tire is even made. Quality of all materials will matter and reflected in the cost of the tires but people like cheap and then complain.


If you experience repeated tread separation yourself with your driving conditions it's time to change tire brand and check ratings marked on them for non special use tires. If roads bad enough sometimes you'll never win.


You are concentrating on cost of gasses when if you just bought better rated tires you could forget all this,


T







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