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sloppy stearing


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dennishazard
User

Jan 12, 2014, 4:19 AM

Post #1 of 12 (1643 views)
sloppy stearing Sign In

98 dodge Durango, 160,000 miles on it 5.9 engine,
got a sloppy searing wheel, bad knuckle on the intermediate shaft, question is can the knuckle be changed or do you need to replace the whole shaft, they wan500 bucks for it at advanced auto but rock auto has it for about 150, whats the labor charge for some thing like this ? thanks,,,,,,,Dennis from milwaukee


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Jan 12, 2014, 6:07 AM

Post #2 of 12 (1632 views)
Re: sloppy stearing Sign In


Quote
bad knuckle on the intermediate shaft,


What does that even mean?



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We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



(This post was edited by Hammer Time on Jan 12, 2014, 8:23 AM)


GC
User
GC profile image

Jan 12, 2014, 7:18 AM

Post #3 of 12 (1628 views)
Re: sloppy stearing Sign In

The whole shaft should be changed. They dont make replacement parts for it. Labor is calling for .6 hours.


____________________________________________________
Willing to help, willing to learn... Rob


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Jan 12, 2014, 8:22 AM

Post #4 of 12 (1623 views)
Re: sloppy stearing Sign In

OK, part #2 is the knuckle. Where does a shaft come into play?





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We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



GC
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Jan 12, 2014, 8:25 AM

Post #5 of 12 (1620 views)
Re: sloppy stearing Sign In

I believe hes talking about the u joint in the intermediate shaft that runs to steering gearbox from column.


____________________________________________________
Willing to help, willing to learn... Rob


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Jan 12, 2014, 8:33 AM

Post #6 of 12 (1619 views)
Re: sloppy stearing Sign In

Could be. The word "knuckle" threw me off.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



GC
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Jan 12, 2014, 8:39 AM

Post #7 of 12 (1617 views)
Re: sloppy stearing Sign In

Up here they rust out bad. Most every dakota or durango I see of that era either has a replacement shaft or a rusted sloppy clunky one.


____________________________________________________
Willing to help, willing to learn... Rob


dennishazard
User

Jan 12, 2014, 3:09 PM

Post #8 of 12 (1606 views)
Re: sloppy stearing Sign In

ok im sorry I don't know what its called but it is the u joint on the steering coloum that runs down the coloum,its causing my steering wheel to have a lot of slop in it, even worse when im on a curve, thanks


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Jan 12, 2014, 3:51 PM

Post #9 of 12 (1604 views)
Re: sloppy stearing Sign In

It's called a steering coupler.

Here is a TSB concerning it.


This bulletin involves replacing the intermediate shaft with a revised part. 1. Position the front wheels straight ahead. Place a steering wheel holder, SNAP-ON TOOL, p/n WA96A, or equivalent, between the steering wheel and the driver's seat to secure the wheel.



2. Remove the toe plate nuts (Figure 1). 3. Remove the pinch bolt and nut securing the upper intermediate shaft to steering column. 4. Open the hood of the vehicle and remove the pinch bolt securing the lower intermediate shaft to the steering gear. 5. Compress the intermediate shaft and remove it from the vehicle. 6. Feed the new intermediate shaft, p/n 55351171AA, through the cowl panel and install it onto the shaft splines of the steering gear. Then, compress and/or lengthen the intermediate shaft enough to be able to install the shaft onto the lower end of the steering column. 7. Secure the intermediate shaft to the lower end of the steering column with a new pinch bolt, p/n 06504926AA, and nut, p/n 06101510, and tighten the nut to 49 Nm (36 ft. lbs.). 8. Secure the intermediate shaft to the steering gear with a new pinch bolt, p/n 06504926AA, and tighten the bolt to 49 Nm (36 ft. lbs.). 9. Install the toe plate onto the cowl panel studs. Tighten the toe plate nuts to 10 Nm (90 in. lbs.). 10. Remove the steering wheel holder from the steering wheel.



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We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



DanD
Veteran / Moderator
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Jan 14, 2014, 5:30 AM

Post #10 of 12 (1581 views)
Re: sloppy stearing Sign In

That part can be purchased right here at CarJunky.
http://www.carjunky.com/...Ntt=Steering%20Shaft
Like HT's copy and paste says; make sure you secure the steering wheel. If allowed to turn in any direction more then its normal amount; you'll break the clock spring in the steering column for the air bag.
I usually just strap the seat belt to the steering wheel.

Dan.

Canadian "EH"






Discretesignals
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Jan 14, 2014, 5:37 AM

Post #11 of 12 (1579 views)
Re: sloppy stearing Sign In

Is this 4wd? The shaft is different from a 4wd if this is 2wd.

I didn't know Carjunky was a parts distributor. Learn something new.





Since we volunteer our time and knowledge, we ask for you to please follow up when a problem is resolved.

(This post was edited by Discretesignals on Jan 14, 2014, 5:39 AM)


dennishazard
User

Jan 14, 2014, 12:32 PM

Post #12 of 12 (1565 views)
Re: sloppy stearing Sign In

ok thanks it is 4 wd ill order part soon






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