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reference for aftermarket pipe thread inline fuel filters


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archibald tuttle
New User

Dec 25, 2014, 7:43 PM

Post #1 of 8 (1110 views)
reference for aftermarket pipe thread inline fuel filters Sign In

I use aftermarket electric fuel pumps in numerous applications. they often come with a pipe threaded inline filter that may be male pipe thread on one end and female on the other male pipe thread on one end and a barbed tube on the other to accept rubber hose directly.

because these are not original equipment applications i never can figure out how to find a reference for the variety of replacement filters that might be available -- because i'm looking for a reference that would refer to maybe the filter diameter and length and the piping configuration for the inlet and outlet rather than a reference that would yield a part number using the make, model and model year of the vehicle.

if anyone has had any experience ordering these filters or can point to a good reference i'd appreciate it.

brian


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Hammer Time profile image

Dec 25, 2014, 8:00 PM

Post #2 of 8 (1106 views)
Re: reference for aftermarket pipe thread inline fuel filters Sign In

That is nort something you should even be doing in automotive applications.



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We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



archibald tuttle
New User

Dec 25, 2014, 8:37 PM

Post #3 of 8 (1100 views)
Re: reference for aftermarket pipe thread inline fuel filters Sign In

 
these are aftermarket electric fuel pumps regularly sold for automotive applications which is why i thought folks who knock around automotive repair might have something to offer?

i use them on various equipment to replace physical lift pumps and as priming pumps for diesels so i don't have to crank the engines to prime with the physical lift pumps, so the vast majority of my applications are industrial.

yeah the high pressure fuel injection pumps that are engineered and wired application specific into fuel injected autos will have inertial defeat or other cautions so they don't keep pumping in case of accident. i will use them occasionally to get out of a pinch with older automotive applications, but generally and presently that is not my application.

the same type of filters i'm looking for used to be used as a secondary filter at the inlet of ford carbs.

although, as i said, i might like to consider a little bit larger daimeter filter as well.


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Dec 25, 2014, 10:53 PM

Post #4 of 8 (1093 views)
Re: reference for aftermarket pipe thread inline fuel filters Sign In

Not for permanent Automotive use. Have these for fuel transfer plus the fuel is filtered in doing so as well. Lower pressure as for carbs. You'll find the filters for carbed Fords of the 60's into 70s with the threads you want/need. I think you'll see both 3/16th NPT and maybe 1/4 NPT for threads. By sight match up what you need. BTW - NPT = Plumbing threaded so don't use Teflon tape and shouldn't need to.


My own use of these is to empty fuel from seasonal equipment and run them dry mostly and a in line diaphragm pumps do not mind running dry.


AYOR always when fussing with fuel and an electric something.


Filters: Try now NAPA especially if you have an old one to match up. The threaded things to barbed stuff also at auto parts or hardware stores but use only brass and only marked fuel/PCV marked fuel line and SS worm clamps as needed. If unsure know that SS (stainless steel) will not pick up with a magnet! Cheap crap will.
Hey: Never found a ready to use pump for fuel transfer and there must be so made one up like you did. Yes you can use a plain larger Ford non threaded fuel filter found on the wall in a blister pack and hose clamps not threaded as said if you wish to filter more or have them last longer.


IDK and you tell me if diesel runs thru a gas intended filter? Ask upon purchase if known or listed. As said my own use is to empty things and use a portable 12v jumper box for power - don't ask!


More: Home centers will have oily transfer drill pumps you can rig up too for oil or oily things. Not tested for fuels or oils yet by me but claims are stated on them. Those must be wet all the time or burn out at once! Cheap - $11US or so for that type.


Non electric. Ask again for suction pump much like a hand grease gun looking thing. When filled acts as a pressure pump as well. No filter but can do your priming tricks for whatevers too and or draw oil out of dipstick tubes and such of things you can't turn over or drain otherwise.
Generators, seasonal yard/farm machines, engine powered pumps and so on,


T



archibald tuttle
New User

Dec 26, 2014, 10:41 AM

Post #5 of 8 (1072 views)
Re: reference for aftermarket pipe thread inline fuel filters Sign In

tom,

thanks for your note. i can't get anybody who knows which way is up at Fram until monday. I'm out of pocket and out of cell service so i can't get my regular parts house which has helped me track this down in the past and relate these configurations to part numbers and crossovers between manufacturers (and admittedly i should have recorded options and parts numbers then). But enjoy coming out to forums and talking to folks about workin' on iron.

The standard filters that come supplied with the electric fuel pumps do indeed pass diesel, well did anyway for a couple of years. i'm getting poor delivery at the moment and want to get both the spin on cartridge fuel filter that fits the mount provided by manufacturer as principle fuel filter and a replacement for this inline addition i made when i added the priming pump so i can replace both when i crack the fuel system.

For many diesels a low pressure electric lift addition is a godsend that helps limit air entering into the fuel system. So I usually add an electric transfer pump at the exit from the fuel tank (which thankfully is on the bottom on most equipment so there is no lift before this first pump vastly lessening the chance of sucking air.

on the EFI gas service side the OEM solution has been to put the electric injection pump into the gas tank at the bottom which accomplishes about the same thing although it is a pain in the butt when it needs service!!!

While I get the general idea that you have to be careful in the use of these pumps as permanent automotive supplies, and they aren't up to the specs of typical gas fuel injection service anyway, i do come from a tradition of older vehicles where, when the fuel pump goes, we put the gas tank on the roof of the cab. Or, more sophisticately, I used to have 1961 dump truck and the fuel system was marginal. i didn't use it that often and the old tank would always be rusty clogging everything up to and including the carburetor, so when i needed to use it i would strap an outboard tank on the roof of the cab and prime to the carburetor with the squeeze bulb (which i zip tied so it hung just outside the drivers window). The bulb was also handy if you needed a lot of gas for flooring it going uphill, i would start pumping by hand.

It is pretty easy to think of reasonable ways you could take advantage of these pumps and maintain a margin of safety for more regular use with the fuel components in more or less their original location, e.g. put a "tee" on the oil pressure sensor and add a close on rise pressure switch so the fuel pump would not be energized if there was no oil pressure and then add a momentary bypass button for starting . . . you could also rob one of the inertial safeties off a car in the junkyard.

I really like these pumps. (for that matter i wish they would replace engine mounted water pumps with electrics as well).

I also one in a homemade tapping fluid recovery systems that I used to thread stainless anchor bolts in foundation.


brian


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Dec 26, 2014, 11:30 AM

Post #6 of 8 (1068 views)
Re: reference for aftermarket pipe thread inline fuel filters Sign In

Not sure if you are only looking on line or right at a brick and mortar place. NAPA rules when it comes to these things for me locally for ages on end.


IMO - forget Fram! Not what they used to be IMO, WIX is still I hope - they can all change - ask or check. For me at NAPA they can still dig out a paper book for wildly old stuff not at their site.


Whatever you are making up might already be ready to go but doubt it. #1, if for permanent use on an engine you should make sure it can't work unless you are present meaning a momentary switch or if the primary source of fuel it should shut down also if engine isn't running or cranking such that if it kept pumping on a dead engine (hot) and a problem it wouldn't just dump fuel all over it!


Pic of sample>>

^^ Was there in stock at NAPA and common to Ford. GM did too. NAPA "Gold" part #s are same as WIX + one number at beginning of part #.


Was searching web for images if you haven't try that. You'll find glass bowl cleanable ones, filters that you can clean and stuff endlessly.


You can (I think you mentioned one) a squeeze bulb common to outboard boats with separate tanks. There no doubt are totally manual pumps all depends on what you want up to mandatory water separating and rust proof materials - those you'll find at Marine specialty parts and also NAPA.


For my own use said up a post or two is to mostly transfer gas or empty a tank NOT to run an engine. I can't tip over a generator so easily and folks do when access to just let them drain isn't practical. I do want the fuel and filtered to use up as none of it ages well.


Pay attention to clamps if/when used. Cheap "worm" types are not commonly made to be full circle pressure even as well as the spring ones you just use pliers can.


This I find tough in stock. Specifically German new vehicle dealers will have full circle clamps on hand (some bucks) that won't rust.


Whatever you are doing think of sparks for anything electrical. Think rust proof for everything fuel. Rubber to be fuel rated meaning gas even if for an oil or diesel. Duh - I wouldn't be swapping around use of something portable for different fuels.


For some assorted stuff I find better luck at smaller hardware stores, even chains more than huge home centers.


If you need to know exact thread size you can get like a feeler gauge barbed to measure threads and an in or outside diameter (word escapes me right now) thing for size both metric and SAE should show.


You'd think NAPA was paying me (not) but they do carry stuff or get stuff for non automotive specific items, Marine, RV and more. Check web site but it lack IMO like many vs being there especially if matching things up,


Tom



Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Hammer Time profile image

Dec 26, 2014, 2:22 PM

Post #7 of 8 (1059 views)
Re: reference for aftermarket pipe thread inline fuel filters Sign In


Quote
i do come from a tradition of older vehicles where, when the fuel pump goes, we put the gas tank on the roof


Hey, maybe that will work on this BMW I'm working on.



~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Dec 26, 2014, 3:49 PM

Post #8 of 8 (1056 views)
Re: reference for aftermarket pipe thread inline fuel filters Sign In

LMAO, HT! I can see it now, a 40 foot extension ladder duct taped up to hold fuel high enough to gain the pressure required! Ha - pass anything but an underpass - too funny, T






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