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Torque wrench help


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Davefranco
New User

Oct 23, 2016, 8:49 PM

Post #1 of 4 (789 views)
Torque wrench help Sign In

Hello,
Complete car beginner here. I'm considering purchasing a torque wrench so that I can do the second tightening of the nuts after the semi annual tire change (summer and winter). Down the road I may begin doing the swap myself but I need a few more tools before I start doing that on my own.

I've looked at something like this, affordable and reviews are good.

Link deleted ................... not allowed

Any advice on this? Also, I know I will need the adapter set (sorry can't recall the actual name for these). Can anyone suggest a set? I have two vehicles currently, a 2006 mazda3 and 2012 elantra.

Thanks!


(This post was edited by Hammer Time on Oct 24, 2016, 4:39 AM)


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Oct 23, 2016, 10:42 PM

Post #2 of 4 (786 views)
Re: Torque wrench help Sign In

Oh wow! Meaning you are frustrated by just swapping a wheel and buying special tools for it? An amazing amount of this is primal common sense but is totally important.
This "second" tightening suggest you've read or heard something like tightening a lug nut with wheels hoisted then check again with it back down on ground type thing.


This should be discussed and clearly put in the vehicle's owner's manual as if you were changing a tire skip to part of lug nut tightening. That info should be in manual and on or around spare tires or covers for them.


IDK - much of the reason for listing any torque measurement for this is it's near impossible to describe what it plain feels like is the correct torque so put to a number you can measure.
May be best to leave this potential novel to site's PM system. Click on my name if this or manual isn't enough to fully explain.


Since this is open web will say do make sure a wheel is set in place flush to hub before initial tightening and stagger sequence as in drawing a star with the number of lug nuts. Does that make sense or need I expound?


Let me say just this since it will be read. More troubles can happen from a lug nut/bolt being over tightened then slightly less than a suggested torque spec. Anyone in doubt probably should be shown in person just how and what is enough with the tools being used,


T



Davefranco
New User

Oct 24, 2016, 9:38 PM

Post #3 of 4 (762 views)
Re: Torque wrench help Sign In

Hi Tom,
There are a few things at play here before you get too critical. I am renting a place with a less than ideal garage, also why I am waiting to invest in tools when I am more permanently situated. I could bite the bullet though and with some guidance make some educated guesses.

What is the best low cost method to lift the car? At my friends he had a good jack which we would use to put half the car on stands and do two wheels at a time.

Also he had a pneumatic system to tighten the nuts before using the hand wrench. I assume this can be done by hand but just takes longer.

By second tightening I was referring to rechecking the torque after a settling period (100km).


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Oct 25, 2016, 1:07 AM

Post #4 of 4 (759 views)
Re: Torque wrench help Sign In

Where did you come up with you call a "settling period" of 100km? There are some new items when replaced you do check later but doubt this. Who on earth as a customer want to go back in two days if you paid to have this done in 15 minutes most of which is hoisting and removing trim parts on wheels.


Two floor jacks and stands placed properly and air tools totally help but not mandatory.


Have to guess your seasonal tires area already on rims. You or last person should have marked the where they go or came from when removed so you know which to put where back and forth each use till new ones are required.
How much did this cost you to just pay to do this vs the rental and equipment plus storing that stuff? You'll never catch up cost savings wise for what is fast work.


If you had a flat tire know how to change it then it goes to see how to fix that anyway frequently taking off that tire to know if it's fixable or perhaps need two new ones to match but you limp in with the spare.


In all of this you need to know tire pressure is correct periodically without just relying on the vehicle to tell you. #1 problems with road service calls is a spare is flat never been checked or years. Tires in storage lost pressure as well.


Yes you can do this but if up to even renting a place for something this basic you are not saving any time or money - just pay to have it done. There's not such torqueing I know of unless specifically stated somewhere for your particular wheels and lug nuts for a reason not common to common vehicles.


Trying to be concise. You need to know where to place jacks and or jack stands without thinking about it too much. Just hoisting a vehicle unless a wild emergency use of a spare you do this on level concrete only. Correct torque by a cross bar or breaker bar should do or a breaker bar sized torque wrench bar you can add a ratchet or just get "torque sticks" that let go when torque is achieved.


This is becoming impractical. You don't have the right place nor the tools or place to store them or do you? Not cost effective IMO for you but anyone should know how to change a tire in an emergency or be towed.


Suggestion: Understand what is being done and just have it done. There's no savings in time or money in this case. Tire rotation schedules are probably every other oil change and even that requires hoisting and we aren't past that yet.


Fully understood not all or even most folks can have the place to do this where vehicles are parked.


I'm probably out of date but swapping two wheels as you are doing at full price I would get maybe $20 bucks - check all air pressure, mark tires inside and off you go so where's the reason to do this yourself? It's also a great time to glance at brakes with wheels off which is not a full inspection but a clue. If this service isn't while you wait still or in your area I guess you have a different situation and reason you wish to do this yourself,


T







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