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rangerbull
Novice

Sep 27, 2015, 6:37 PM

Post #1 of 6 (862 views)
Power steering fluid Sign In

got a 1999 ford f150 4x4 4.6L and was coming home from a fishing trip pulling my boat at 70 mph down interstate. we started smelling what seemed to smell like anti freeze but truck wasnt heating up. air condition was on. turned air condition off and smell wasnt as bad but still there. we pulled in to a truck stop and checked under hold and everything seemed to be ok except for power streeing fluid looked as if it was boiling or being shaken up. turned truck off and it stopped. no leakage as we can see around air con and no leaks anywhere. truck runs fine. air is still ice cold. anybody know what I am smelling


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Sep 27, 2015, 11:11 PM

Post #2 of 6 (849 views)
Re: Power steering fluid Sign In

? Odor and PS fluid boiling. Do you mean you checked it with engine running and if so it would look like that. What PS or hydraulic oils can do is foam such that the air bubble displace fluid and can spill over onto whatever and burn.


Hey - 70MPH with a trailer and probably hot side of weather it's maxed out. If you don't have a PS oil cooler you may need one AND an upgrade of fluid to a high end compatible fluid which may be a synthetic trans fluid or other but must be compatible.


Other again: This engine also was made in many or all for some years with a plastic intake manifold that did seal coolant and could leak. An ear of it would crack and only a new one was/is the fix.


You don't see anything on ground or other evidence other than odor so isn't clear yet? What is low if anything?


Some if it's been a while since a long hard ride cake like oily stuff that could be normal got hot enough to drip down on something hot so odor would be the best evidence then looking at hot parts (exhaust parts) for the evidence.


It's working hard and if you expect it to in even moderate extremes you add coolers for things like PS, trans fluid or upgrade cooling system in general.


IMO - an F-150 is great but the work and load ability is the same as just a full size car of the same basic drivetrain layout and probably exceeding what it was meant to do. Problem will follow if overworked,


T



rangerbull
Novice

Sep 28, 2015, 9:29 AM

Post #3 of 6 (834 views)
Re: Power steering fluid Sign In

this morning I drove truck and tried turning on heater to see if that was a problem and had fluid run down from under dash and still smelled of anti freeze. thinking maybe heater core as I had no heat and windsheild started fogging up on defrost. what do you think on that. watched some vidios and seems like a big job to under take for me.


Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Hammer Time profile image

Sep 28, 2015, 9:33 AM

Post #4 of 6 (833 views)
Re: Power steering fluid Sign In

Yep, sounds like you hit the nail on the head on that one. Heater core for sure.



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We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Sep 28, 2015, 11:17 AM

Post #5 of 6 (824 views)
Re: Power steering fluid Sign In

Agree, nailed especially if you can even see an antifreeze drip. Now till you can do that make a "U" turn at the heater hoses at the firewall. Reason is some have a lot to do with even internal engine temps. Till you really need heat if no other issues keep it full and bypassed that way and you should be fine.


Just one more. If you do need defrost it wont work well so carry towels till done. Heater core can be a tough job,


Tom
(edited in to add) Good time to replace heater or other hoses for the job. Warning: Some Fords in particular use a restrictor in the inlet hose to the heater core and you should find one. If not it may need one as engine RPM when stressed the water pumps could blow heater cores from pressure above the rating of the cap when working hard and hot! If mine I'd put one in just anyway as without and was uses you can hear water (coolant) running thru the core sometimes. It's a small tapered metal plug* that goes INSIDE the inlet heater hose. Sorry if not used on this it's never discussed on ones that did!
That plug was factory installed hidden in the hose and usually discarded not knowing one was there. Feel for it - if OE hose and not there it didn't have one by all chances nor need one.........



(This post was edited by Tom Greenleaf on Sep 28, 2015, 11:27 AM)


Discretesignals
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
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Sep 28, 2015, 5:59 PM

Post #6 of 6 (817 views)
Re: Power steering fluid Sign In

Something to keep in mind, especially when it pays 7 hours to do a heater core on one of those.





Quote
TSB 06-21-19

10/30/06

HEATER CORE LEAKAGE AND ELECTROLYSIS (INFORMATION ONLY)

FORD:
1997-2002 Contour
1997-2007 Crown Victoria, Mustang, Taurus
2000-2007 Focus
2002-2005 Thunderbird
2005-2007 Five Hundred, Freestyle
2006-2007 Fusion
1997-1999 F-250 Light Duty
1997-2003 Windstar
1997-2007 E-Series, Expedition, Explorer,
F-150, F-53 Motorhome Chassis,
F-Super Duty, Ranger

2000-2005 Excursion
2001-2003 Explorer Sport
2001-2007 Escape, Explorer Sport Trac
2004 F-150 Heritage
2004-2007 Freestar
2005-2007 Escape Hybrid
1999-2007 F-650, F-750

LINCOLN:
1997-2002 Continental
1997-2007 Town Car
2000-2006 Lincoln LS
2006 Zephyr
2007 MKZ
1998-2007 Navigator
2002-2003 Blackwood
2003-2005 Aviator
2006-2007 Mark LT

MERCURY:
1997-2002 Cougar, Mystique
1997-2005 Sable
1997-2007 Grand Marquis
2005-2007 Montego
2006-2007 Milan
1997-2002 Villager
1997-2007 Mountaineer
2005-2007 Mariner
2006-2007 Mariner Hybrid

This article supersedes TSB 01-15-6 to update the vehicle model years and Service Procedure.

ISSUE
The majority of repeat heater core leaks are due to high flow rate or use of poor quality coolant. However, electrolysis should also be checked, especially when repeat repairs have occurred.

ACTION
If the heater core is leaking, review the location of the leakage and check the condition of the coolant.

SERVICE PROCEDURE

1. Review the location of the leakage and check the condition of the coolant:

a. If leaks are found on the inlet (or outlet) tubes entering / exiting the heater core, it is most likely due to due to high flow rate - replace the heater core and install a restrictor in the heater hose closest to the engine block, reference Workshop Manual, Section 412.

b. If leaks are found in the body of the heater core itself, and does not appear to be the result of physical damage like contact or puncture, check the coolant for possible electrolysis.

Testing For Electrolysis

Check for voltage in the cooling system by touching the negative contact of a voltmeter to the battery ground or a known good ground and suspend the positive lead in the coolant, making sure it is in contact with the coolant but not touching any metal part of the radiator or cooling system. Both AC and DC voltages must be checked. Vehicles normally have DC voltages; however, a faulty engine block heater or faulty diode in the alternator can produce AC voltages. It is understood that coolant is lost due to heater core failure but try to obtain a voltage reading on the old coolant in the engine block before addition to or replacement of. To keep more coolant from exiting the heater core clamp off heater core lines and measure coolant in the engine block. Try not to dilute the original coolant with new coolant during testing if possible.

1. Determine whether coolant condition is acceptable.

a. Remove both cables from the battery and ensure they do not contact each other or the vehicle.

b. Touch negative lead of voltmeter to engine ground and positive lead in the coolant.

NOTE
POSITIVE TEST PROBE IS IN THE COOLANT FOR TESTING.

c. Check the voltage in the cooling system. If less than or equal to 0.4 volts (V) OK, reconnect battery cables and proceed to Step 2.

d. If greater than 0.4 V, flush cooling system thoroughly.

e. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V.

f. Reconnect battery cables.

g. Refill the system with appropriate Motorcraft® engine coolant.

2. Check for loose or missing grounds at static conditions.

a. Turn off all accessories. Turn ignition on but do not start engine.

b. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.

c. Voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V on all grounds OK.

d. Any one greater than 0.4 V, check and clean ground cable connections.

e. Check accessories without using the on off switch on the vehicle instrument panel, use a jumper wire to ground.

f. Plug in engine block heater, if equipped, and test.

g. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V.

h. Unplug engine block heater, if equipped.

3. Check for loose, missing, or inadequate grounds.

a. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.

b. Crank engine but do not start.

c. Monitor voltage while cranking. less than or equal to 0.4 V OK

d. If greater than 0.4 V, ground or repair starter.

e. Start engine and run at about 2000 rpm.

f. Turn on all accessories including those customer only uses occasionally such as CB radio, cell phone, etc.

g. Test with ground probe to battery ground, engine ground, and vehicle ground sequentially.

h. Voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V OK

i. If greater than 0.4 V, turn off one item at a time until V drops to less than or equal to 0.4 V. Repair ground to the accessory just identified.

j. Recheck voltage less than or equal to 0.4 V

k. Turn the DVOM to AC volts.

l. Check for ANY AC voltage greater than 0.4.

m. If any AC voltage is present then try turning off each accessory one at a time including blower motor and any fan motors.

n. If AC voltage is still present then shut engine off and remove B+ from the alternator and tape it up then retest.

o. If voltage drop is gradual to less than or equal to 0.4 V, the ground straps may simply be overloaded by added accessories. Test by using heavy gauge jumper to ground. If indicated, install heavier gauge ground strap(s) and recheck.

NOTE
If vehicle is equipped with electric cooling fans, be sure they cycle during this testing and monitor voltage when they are on and when off.

CAUTION
DO NOT GROUND HEATER CORE. IF THE HEATER CORE IS GROUNDED, YOU HAVE PROVIDED THE ELECTROLOSIS A PATH THROUGH THE HEATER CORE. THIS WOULD CAUSE THE HEATER CORE TO BECOME AN ANODE OR RECEIVER AND IT WOULD PROMOTE THE ELECTROLOSIS, OR ANY STRAY VOLTAGE TO USE THE COOLANT AS THE GROUND PATH.

4. Refill the engine cooling system, reference Workshop Manual, Section 303-03.

NOTE
IF THE HEAT OUTPUT IS INSUFFICIENT, OR THE ENGINE DOES NOT REACH NORMAL OPERATING TEMPERATURES, VERIFY PROPER THERMOSTAT OPERATION AND REPEAT PROCEDURE IF REQUIRED.






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