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Touch up/drying time advice


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neil4374
Novice

Jun 25, 2017, 10:48 PM

Post #1 of 9 (674 views)
  post locked   Touch up/drying time advice  

Hey guys,
I would appreciate some advice.
I have tried to seek the answers to my questions but have been unable to find precise answers.

Firstly, my car has some scratches. Not bad at all. In fact small and thin. I have read up on using primer first before using the touch up pen and then finally waiting a month before waxing.

1.What I would like to know is how long do I need to let the primer dry before I can use the touch up pen?
2. And how long do I need to wait between touch up coats?
If possible I would like to get this done in one day- because I cant guarantee it wont rain!

Secondly, I need to spray paint a small part of my plastic bumper. The scratches aren't so big but it requires more than a touch up. Again I have read up on what to do here. Do I apply the same drying times that will be recommended for a small touch up pen?

Lastly,
A small part of clear coat has peeled off my car. I was going to apply some clear coat to fix this problem. What is the recommended drying time before the car can be exposed to the elements?

Many thanks:)


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Jun 26, 2017, 12:02 AM

Post #2 of 9 (669 views)
  post locked   Re: Touch up/drying time advice  

The reason you aren't going to get precise answers is simply because you are highly unlikely to make this look very good at all without a real inspection and estimate by a professional body shop.


Clearcoat peeling? From what? Age in sun or lousy work once before?


IMO - ordinary brush in cap touch up is OK for a nick or chip. Scratches if thru clearcoat into paint or the metal or plastic where ever they are if you really want this to look proper like there wasn't a problem ever you'll fail with common products making a pro job harder and yes small stuff will cost.


There's one best suggestion is to have a profession look at the problems and suggest what will work for your pain tolerance for how much to have it done or what to do that doesn't make it harder to fix properly if you care enough for the particular vehicle.


It's about impossible to know exactly what you expect or what problems you'll run into so simply need to be looked at in person for suggestions on perfect or what would just look better and how. The products sold at chain stores or ordinary parts stores are not professional products. AYOR if you do that and it comes out horrible,


T


The



neil4374
Novice

Jun 26, 2017, 12:18 AM

Post #3 of 9 (661 views)
  post locked   Re: Touch up/drying time advice  


In Reply To
The reason you aren't going to get precise answers is simply because you are highly unlikely to make this look very good at all without a real inspection and estimate by a professional body shop.


Clearcoat peeling? From what? Age in sun or lousy work once before?


IMO - ordinary brush in cap touch up is OK for a nick or chip. Scratches if thru clearcoat into paint or the metal or plastic where ever they are if you really want this to look proper like there wasn't a problem ever you'll fail with common products making a pro job harder and yes small stuff will cost.


There's one best suggestion is to have a profession look at the problems and suggest what will work for your pain tolerance for how much to have it done or what to do that doesn't make it harder to fix properly if you care enough for the particular vehicle.


It's about impossible to know exactly what you expect or what problems you'll run into so simply need to be looked at in person for suggestions on perfect or what would just look better and how. The products sold at chain stores or ordinary parts stores are not professional products. AYOR if you do that and it comes out horrible,


T


The


Thanks for your input.
I do agree that professionals will do a better job. I am content with touching up. I have already bought the products and would appreciate answers of the drying times of each product. it doesn't have to be exact and will h p me to do the best I can with what I have


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Jun 26, 2017, 4:27 AM

Post #4 of 9 (657 views)
  post locked   Re: Touch up/drying time advice  

OK - If drying time is all your after it like any painting anywhere totally depends on temperature and humidity.
Do know you need compatible paints whatever you are using.
Note: I've seen both good and bad work from pro shops. Any trade can vary some or a lot auto body and paint no exception. They should all have a spray booth, purposely dust free controlled environment not just outdoors no telling what trouble anyone would get in.


Real automotive paints are scary expensive.


Super fine work when called for is a total skill and art both. Do know that the rubber (we call those that) is different for painting if you got the entire new skin to do up than painting metal or paint wouldn't tolerate it.


Refresh: Bad work is harder to correct than leaving it alone and getting it right when you want it as right as it can be,


T



neil4374
Novice

Jun 26, 2017, 5:39 AM

Post #5 of 9 (646 views)
  post locked   Re: Touch up/drying time advice  

Did you actually read my post?
What are you talking about 'Real automotive paints are scary expensive'
It would be better if you didn't reply rather than something that is wholly irrelevant to my situation.


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Jun 26, 2017, 5:51 AM

Post #6 of 9 (639 views)
  post locked   Re: Touch up/drying time advice  

The "real" automotive paint and material suppliers don't usually deal with the general public! Not around me. People don't have spray guns worth a damn nor ask for special color matching.


You asked about drying time pretty much suggests you are not in this biz or around it much or even at all. I've done up show cars but final finish is done by the most experienced pro I can find with that spray booth, dust free. Most people don't just have one of those in their collection of things,


T



Hammer Time
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Hammer Time profile image

Jun 26, 2017, 5:54 AM

Post #7 of 9 (633 views)
  post locked   Re: Touch up/drying time advice  

You are the one that is asking nonsensical questions.

First off, you cannot spray repair a scratch. You do not prime a "touch up" situation.

If all you want to do is touch up, then you simply dab some paint into the scratch the best you can. Of course it will not look perfect. Nothing short of sanding, priming, painting and clear coating the entire area with professional paint by a professional body man will work.

Your feeble attempt at trying to side step doing a proper repair will end with something that looks worse than what you already have.



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We offer help in answering questions, clarifying things or giving advice but we are not a substitute for an on-site inspection by a professional.



neil4374
Novice

Jun 26, 2017, 5:56 AM

Post #8 of 9 (631 views)
  post locked   Re: Touch up/drying time advice  

illiterate rant deleted.


(This post was edited by Hammer Time on Jun 26, 2017, 6:04 AM)


Tom Greenleaf
Ultimate Carjunky / Moderator
Tom Greenleaf profile image

Jun 26, 2017, 6:07 AM

Post #9 of 9 (611 views)
  post locked   Re: Touch up/drying time advice  

It's a trade of it's own sport with 100s of hours of training. If just anyone could do fine work out of Wallyworld it wouldn't need to be it's own trade.


Essentially if you have to ask at least show it to a pro and probably find out it's an expensive proposition to correct scratches and procedures to paint rubber/plastic vs metal and more.


BTW - RH right now is 46% on a meter so I do pay attention. What it is the day you wish to do what those things matter,


T







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